September 2014 eNewsletter

In This Issue:

Survey for the Development of the ADTSEA 4.0 Curriculum

Parents: Your Teens Are Watching

New Quiz Puts Teen Drivers to the Test

Teen Driving and Parents

Students Use Humor to Teach Peers About Dangers of Distracted Driving

Drowsy Driving and Risk Behaviors — 10 States and Puerto Rico, 2011–2012

Voices: Distracted driving hits home — hard

Editorial: Graduated Licenses Save Lives

Report Highlights Teen Distracted Driving Policies and Programs

What is National Road Safety Foundation’s Teen Lane?

Teaching Strategies from the Toy Box to the Glove Box

Review of the ADSTSEA 3.0 Curriculum

Upcoming Events

NETSEA
October 23rd

SCDTSEA
November 21st

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Survey for the Development of the ADTSEA 4.0 Curriculum
The American Driver and Traffic Safety Education Association (ADTSEA) is conducting a survey to assist with the development of a new and improved 4.0 curriculum. We would like to seek your assistance to determine ways to improve and update the curriculum. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

To complete the survey please use the following link to Survey Monkey.

Parents: Your Teens Are Watching
A research study conducted by the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute and Toyota’s Collaborative Safety Research Center reveals that parental driving habits have a powerful influence on teenage drivers. Researchers surveyed more than 5,500 teens and parents across the country in an effort to investigate driving risks and pinpoint ways to ensure the safety of teen drivers. Read more here.

New Quiz Puts Teen Drivers to the Test
In honor of Safe Teen Driving Day®, Be Smart. Be Well. releases new online quiz testing teen drivers' knowledge of driving risks and driving distractions. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports teen drinking and driving is on the decline, other driving risks remain; and motor vehicle crashes are still the leading cause of death for U.S. teens. Using humor and a light-hearted style, the Teen Driving Quiz presents multiple-choice questions on driving risks and information about how to manage them. Read more here.

Teen Driving and Parents
Driving is a constant learning process.

Motor vehicle crashes are the No. 1 killer of teens. Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) can keep your teen alive behind the wheel and help your teen develop safe driving habits. With GDL, teens start driving in low-risk situations, then progressively face more difficult situations as they gain experience.

This is a scary time - you want to protect your teen, but you are beginning to relinquish control. These simple guidelines can help you understand what you can do to keep your teen driver safe, from the basics such as requiring your teen to buckle up, to the more advanced, such as ensuring your teen has the ability to drive well - and safe. Read more here.

Students Use Humor to Teach Peers About Dangers of Distracted Driving
Some Connecticut high school students are trying to spread the message of safe teen driving through comedy performances.

The student production is called “Drive It Home”, and it is aimed at spreading awareness about safe driving, set around a session between a “Dr. Phil”-type psychologist, a parent, and child.

"There is a lot of lack of communication going on. The mom is not doing appropriate parenting, and so the skit is explaining different forms of parenting, how to be a good parent, and how to go through the steps of driving with your teenager," said Catherine McElaney, one of the student actors.
Read more here.

Drowsy Driving and Risk Behaviors — 10 States and Puerto Rico, 2011–2012
Findings in published reports have suggested that drowsy driving is a factor each year in as many as 7,500 fatal motor vehicle crashes (approximately 25%) in the United States (1,2). CDC previously reported that, in 2009–2010, 4.2% of adult respondents in 19 states and the District of Columbia reported having fallen asleep while driving at least once during the previous 30 days (3). Adults who reported usually sleeping ≤6 hours per day, snoring, or unintentionally falling asleep during the day were more likely to report falling asleep while driving compared with adults who did not report these sleep patterns (3). However, limited information has been published on the association between drowsy driving and other risk behaviors that might contribute to crash injuries or fatalities. Therefore, CDC analyzed responses to survey questions regarding drowsy driving among 92,102 respondents in 10 states and Puerto Rico to the 2011–2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) surveys. The results showed that 4.0% reported falling asleep while driving during the previous 30 days. In addition to known risk factors, drowsy driving was more prevalent among binge drinkers than non-binge drinkers or abstainers and also more prevalent among drivers who sometimes, seldom, or never wear seatbelts while driving or riding in a car, compared with those who always or almost always wear seatbelts. Drowsy driving did not vary significantly by self-reported smoking status. Interventions designed to reduce binge drinking and alcohol-impaired driving, to increase enforcement of seatbelt use, and to encourage adequate sleep and seeking treatment for sleep disorders might contribute to reductions in drowsy driving crashes and related injuries. Read more here.

Voices: Distracted driving hits home — hard
This nation's talking/texting-while-driving epidemic caught up with me this past weekend in the most violent way.

Moments after leaving USA TODAY's offices in suburban Virginia on Saturday evening, I hopped on Interstate 66 for a quick drive home. The skies were overcast, a light mist was falling, and the sun was beginning to set. Read more here.

Editorial: Graduated Licenses Save Lives
It is a rare day that a minor tweak to public policy makes such a positive and fundamental difference to society. According to a recent report from the Arkansas Center for Health Improvement, acting in partnership with the Injury Prevention Center at Arkansas Children’s Hospital, we have strong evidence that has occurred here in the Natural State.

In 2009, the state Legislature passed the Graduated Driver’s License law. The purpose of the law was to afford teenagers the opportunity to gain experience behind the wheel, while at the same time reducing several persistent risk factors. Read more here.

Report Highlights Teen Distracted Driving Policies and Programs
WASHINGTON, D.C.—As young drivers head back to school, a new Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) report explores the problem of teen distracted driving and highlights promising policies designed to address it. According to the most recent data, teens represent the largest proportion of drivers who are distracted at the time of a fatal crash. These crashes impact not only the distracted teen drivers, but also other roadway users: 57 percent of those killed were the teen drivers; the rest were their passengers, other vehicle occupants, pedestrians and bicyclists.

The report, Distracted & Dangerous: Helping States Keep Teens Focused on the Road, looks at legislation, enforcement and educational programs developed and implemented by the public and private sector at the national, state and local levels. Read more here.

What is National Road Safety Foundation’s Teen Lane?
Teen Lane is an extension of The National Road Safety Foundation (NRSF). The NRSF recognizes the need for teens and tweens to have a user-friendly place where they can learn more about driver safety. Young drivers, ages 15 to 20, are especially vulnerable to death and injury on our roadways; in fact, traffic crashes are the leading cause of death for teenagers in America. Mile for mile, teens are involved in three times as many fatal crashes as all other drivers.

Follow the link for free programs, Short Film Videos, PowerPoint Presentations and Public Service Announcements all geared towards teens and teen driving issues. Read more here.

Teaching Strategies from the Toy Box to the Glove Box
Presentation is on teaching strategies in student Drivers Education not only from the curriculum but by engaging students in hands on activities and demonstrations. This allows them to be engaged in learning not just sitting and listening. Longer lasting connections are created with what the student is learning in class and real time driving. Students that are involved and engaged in learning ask more questions and in the end learn more. Read more here.

Review of the ADSTSEA 3.0 Curriculum: Meeting Training Needs and Introduction of 4.0 Curriculum
Presentation is on how the current 3.0 technology works along with alternative ways of using the curriculum.  A 4.0 curriculum survey and open discussion on what clients would like to see in the updated curriculum. Read more here.


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