October 2013 eNewsletter

In This Issue:

National Safety Council Announces 2013 Teen Driving Safety Leadership Award Winners

Get Behind National Teen Driver Safety Week

Teens Learn First Hand, Effects of
"Texting and Driving"

Teens, Parents Differ on Graduated Driver's Licenses.

Bill Would Ban Ohio Teens from Driving Buddies

Teen Driving Crashes Declining

Study: Teens Who Drive with Other Teens Pose
Accident Risk

Insurance Tied to Driving Habits Picks up Speed

Young Drivers Not Living up to Parents’ Expectations

 

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SCDTSEA Fall Conference

Nov 22nd, 2013

 

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National Safety Council Announces 2013 Teen Driving Safety Leadership Award Winners
ITASCA, Ill., The National Safety Council today announced Beth Schuerman of the Alaska Injury Prevention Center, Impact Teen Drivers and Traffic Safe Communities Network of Santa Clara County as the winners of its 5th annual Teen Driving Safety Leadership Awards, supported by the General Motors Foundation.  Car crashes are the leading cause of death for teens. The Teen Driving Safety Leadership Award recognizes exceptional contributions that prevent car crashes, injuries and deaths involving teen drivers. This year's winners stood out from more than 50 nominations for the reach of their initiatives and measurements shown on the initiatives' impact on teen driver safety.  "These organizations have worked tirelessly to help protect our youngest and most vulnerable drivers," said Janet Froetscher, president and CEO of NSC. "Their efforts have yielded measurable change which will no doubt help in our ongoing efforts to curb teen driver crashes and save lives." The Alaska Injury Prevention Center, used two programs, Teen Buckle Up and Raise Your Voice, to reduce the numbers of car crashes involving teens who were either impaired or not wearing seat belts. Teen seatbelt use in Anchorage increased 26 percent since the Teen Buckle Up program began in 2006.  Read more here.

Get Behind National Teen Driver Safety Week
The next National Teen Driver Safety Week (NTDSW) takes place on October 20-26, 2013. This year's theme is ‘It Takes Two: Shared Expectations for Teens and Parents for Driving.’  Whether you’re still practice driving or driving on your own, you and a parent (or other trusted adult) should work together to help you become a safe skilled driver. You should expect and advocate for support in driving from a trusted adult. Here are some tips to get you started: - See more here.

Teens Learn First Hand, Effects of
"Texting and Driving"

BILLINGS - Studies show cell phone use is the cause reported in 18% of distracted driving related fatalities. No doubt, a growing problem across America, but experts say, there is a solution. When drivers can actually "experience" first hand, the effects of texting while driving, it truly puts the "action" into perspective. In that, may lie the answer to the problem. Read more here.

Teens, Parents Differ on Graduated Driver's Licenses.
Graduated Driver Licensing programs, in which young drivers earn privileges as they gain experience under the watchful eye of their parents, have become a crucial part of the nation's effort to ease teenagers through those dangerous first years of driving. Read more here.

Bill Would Ban Ohio Teens from Driving Buddies
COLUMBUS —A Republican state lawmaker is proposing tough new driving restrictions on Ohio teens, including prohibiting them from transporting even one additional teenager. State Rep. Rick Perales, of Beavercreek, tells The Columbus Dispatch his bill would bring Ohio's rules closer to the recommendations of safety groups. Read more here.            

Teen Driving Crashes Declining
New data shows a decrease in the number of teen drivers getting into serious crashes on Minnesota roads. According to the Minnesota Department of Public Safety, the number of teen drivers involved in fatal crashes has been cut nearly in half since 2007. In that same time period, the total number of crashes involving teens has dropped by more than 30 percent. Experts say the decrease is likely due to restrictions that went into effect in 2008 that require new drivers to hold their permit for six months before getting a license. The restrictions also prohibit new drivers from having more than one passenger, and from driving between midnight and 5 a.m. Read more here.                

Study: Teens Who Drive with Other Teens Pose
Accident Risk

Few would argue that teens — and adults for that matter — should ignore text messages while behind the wheel of the car and focus on the real task at hand: “Driving” But when it comes to novice teen drivers, it now appears that one of the most dangerous distractions in the car during the past decade is not a smartphone but other teens. A new study by the respected Texas Transportation Institute found that while the number of teen drivers involved in fatal crashes has gone down significantly, the relative risk factor for traffic deaths has increased for teens who drive with peers. Read more here.

Insurance Tied to Driving Habits Picks up Speed
Privacy concerns have limited the growth of auto insurance plans that are priced according to when, how far and how aggressively people drive. But younger drivers may soon bring the pay-as-you-drive plans into the mainstream. Some industry insiders believe that money-conscious and mostly privacy-blind drivers in their 20s and 30s could accelerate acceptance of usage-based car insurance. Read more here.

Young Drivers Not Living up to Parents’ Expectations
State Farm recently put out a survey where they surveyed 500 parents of teen drivers, and an independent sample of 500 teen drivers. One of the things found is that parents overestimate how much teens obey two key provisions GDL laws. For example, when parents and teens were asked why teens do or do not follow GDL laws with the option of peer pressure or police, most parents listed peer pressure as the most likely reason while teens listed thinking police will not catch them as the most likely reason. Read more here.

 

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