November 2013 eNewsletter

In This Issue:

TEENS INVITED TO FIGHT IMPAIRED DRIVING THROUGH 5th ANNUAL “DRIVE2LIFE” PSA CONTEST

Driven To Distraction; Manheim Central Moms Want Teens to Learn Dangers Of Careless Driving

I Drive Safely Announces Winners of Its Teen Essay Contest Promoting Safe Driving Habits During the '100 Deadliest Days for Teen Drivers'

New Devices Monitor Driving, but Trust is a Concern for Teens, Parents

Students get 'Behind the Wheel' to Experience Levels of Impairment

NHTSA Unveils '5 to Drive' Teen Safety Campaign to Reduce High Death Rate of Teens

Drop in Teen Driving Tracks with Teen Unemployment, HLDI Study Finds

Can Pediatricians Successfully Promote Safe Driving Agreements Between Teens, Parents?

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TEENS INVITED TO FIGHT IMPAIRED DRIVING THROUGH 5th ANNUAL “DRIVE2LIFE” PSA CONTEST
The National Road Safety Foundation and Scholastic, the global  children’s publishing, education and media company, are looking for ideas from young people to help educate and convince their peers about the risks of the dangers of impaired driving and how to avoid being in a car driven by an impaired driver. Entries are now open for the 5th annual Drive2Life PSA Contest.  The winner will receive a $1,000 prize and an all-expenses paid trip to New York to work with an Emmy Award-winning TV director to turn his or her idea into a public service message that will be broadcast nationwide next May during Global Youth Traffic Safety Month. Click here for the press release and here for contest rules and entry forms.

Driven To Distraction; Manheim Central Moms Want Teens to Learn Dangers Of Careless Driving
Kelsey Ivie was texting behind the wheel when she ran a red light and T-boned a car in the intersection. Fortunately, no one was injured in the accident because it was only a simulation. But the Manheim Central High School freshman, who is looking forward to getting her driver's permit next year, learned her lesson nonetheless. "It was hard to pay attention to the road and text at the same time," she said. "I don't plan on texting when I get my license." Read more here.

I Drive Safely Announces Winners of Its Teen Essay Contest Promoting Safe Driving Habits During the '100 Deadliest Days for Teen Drivers'
 I Drive Safely, the nation's leading online provider of driver education training, today announced the winners of its Teen Essay Contest, which was designed to encourage teens to use safe driving habits during the "100 Deadliest Days for Teen Drivers" from Memorial Day to Labor Day. According to the National Safety Council (NSC), seven of the top 10 deadliest driving days of the year occur in June, July and August.   Winners were selected from hundreds of entrants by a panel of judges based on originality, clarity and effectiveness of style and organization and adherence to format and length rules. Each winning essay will be revealed this week Tuesday through Thursday on the company's blog called The Express Lane. See the winners here.

New Devices Monitor Driving, but Trust is a Concern for Teens, Parents
When Brookfield Central High School student Chloe Olier started driving earlier this summer, her parents Dany and Virginie installed a DriveCam, a monitoring device that records video whenever she makes driving mistakes. She wasn't pleased. It emails missteps to her parents, who review the footage online with her. "I felt violated, because it was going to be recording me," the 16-year-old said. Chloe now says she'd recommend it to her friends because it has made her a better driver. The machine, obtained for free from the family's auto insurer, American Family Insurance, recorded her 23 times the first week. Now, she only makes sporadic mistakes. "It's nice because it tells me what I'm doing wrong so I don't do it anymore," she said. It's only intrusive while it's recording, "so in order not to feel that way, I drive well." Read more here.

Students get 'Behind the Wheel' to Experience Levels of Impairment
The term demolition derby likely took on some new meaning for at least some teen drivers at the high school this week. That is because some of them got their first experience at driving in an impaired state while not impaired, with the use of specialized “beer” goggles that simulate different levels of impairment. With the assistance of a Show Low Police officer who was in the car, drivers tried to make their way through an obstacle course set up in one of the school’s parking lots without hitting any orange safety cones. A line of teenagers got behind the wheel one at a time and tried to get the best results. The event was sponsored by the school’s Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) Club with President Alea Robinson, 17, and Vice President Karie Warren, 17, present. Also in attendance was SADD Adviser Martha FitzPartrick. FitzPartrick said the incentive behind the simulation event was to raise awareness among teen drivers of the dangers associated with drinking and driving, as well as any form of distracted driving. Read more here.

NHTSA Unveils '5 to Drive' Teen Safety Campaign to Reduce High Death Rate of Teens
Motor-vehicle crashes are the number one killer of teens in America; almost half of teens killed in crashes are the driver themselves. The U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) unveiled a new campaign that challenges parents to discuss five critical driving practices with their teenage drivers that can have the greatest beneficial impacts in the event of a crash. The new "5 to Drive" campaign was launched to coincide with National Teen Driver Safety Week, October 20-26, 2013. Read more here.

Drop in Teen Driving Tracks with Teen Unemployment, HLDI Study Finds
A recent drop in teen driving likely comes down to simple economics. Young people today may want to drive just as much as they did a generation ago but simply can't afford it, a new report from the Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI) suggests. While some observers have speculated that the rise of cellphones and social media has made driving less of an imperative in teens' eyes, the study shows that the decline in teen driving coincided with the economic slowdown, and the shortage of work has disproportionately affected teenage job seekers. "It looks like teens just can't afford to drive," says HLDI Vice President Matt Moore. "Paying for their own cars, gas and insurance is hard if they can't find a job. At the same time, kids who count on Mom and Dad to help them also may be out of luck if their parents have been affected by the recession." Read more here.

Can Pediatricians Successfully Promote Safe Driving Agreements Between Teens, Parents?
Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among teens. A study presented Monday, Oct. 28, at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exhibition in Orlando evaluated a pediatric intervention that directed families to a new web-based Checkpoints™ safe driving program for parents of teen drivers.
In collaboration with Pediatric Research in Office Settings (PROS), the American Academy of Pediatrics' practice-based research network, the study authors created a brief intervention protocol, training plan, promotional materials, and a Checkpoints™ website, which will be sustained by the AAP. Read more here.


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