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February 2014 eNewsletter

In This Issue:

2014 ADTSEA Elections

2014 Annual ADTSEA Conference    

2014 Annual NSSP Conference

NSSP Call for Proposals

NEW PROGRAM TALKS TO TEENS ABOUT IMPAIRED DRIVING

Minnesota Driver and Traffic Safety Education (MDTSEA)
Annual Conference

St. Cloud State University is refreshing the available pool of adjunct faculty members to teach Traffic Safety Education courses.  

Many Teens Taking a Pass on a Driver's License

Pay Attention, Kid! Novice Teen Drivers Often Distracted

Distracted Driving Riskiest for New Drivers

NH Lawmakers Driven To Curb Distracted Driving

Teen Drivers Become Distracted Quickly

 

Upcoming Events

SouthEast Region ADTSEA

Feb 21st &22nd

NYSDTEA 2014
Conference

March 7th & 8th

CASE 2014 Conference

March 15th

MDTSEA 2014 Conference

March 22nd

NDDTSEA 2014 Conference

March 27th - 29th

 

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Send your News, Upcoming Events, or Articles that you wish to share with ADTSEA members so we can post them in our future Newsletters to: ADTSEA Office

Our mailing address is:

ADTSEA Office
1434 Trim Tree Road
Indiana, PA 15701
724-801-8132
office@adtsea.org

 

 

 

2014 ADTSEA Elections
The 2014 ADTSEA elections will be conducted electronically using Survey Monkey.  Beginning March 1, 2014, watch your email for a link and instructions on how to cast your vote.  You can view the candidates and read their biographies on the ADTSEA website at www.adtsea.org.

2014 Annual ADTSEA Conference
The 58th Annual ADTSEA Conference will be held on July 13-16, 2014 in Wichita, Kansas at the DoubleTree by Hilton Wichita Airport Hotel.
Early Bird registration ends June 1, 2014.

DoubleTree by Hilton Wichita Airport
Reservations: 1-800-247-4458
Ask for the ADTSEA Conference Room of $106.00 per night
For more information visit our website at www.adtsea.org.

2014 Annual NSSP Conference
July 12-14, 2014 – Double Tree by Hilton at Wichita Airport, Kansas
The National Student Safety Program Annual Teen Leadership Training Conference invites teens from across the nation to share their peer education activities and projects, learn about new ideas and campaigns they can conduct in their schools and communities, and enjoy a memorable conference experience! This year’s conference is titled “Shining in Safety”.
For more information visit our website here.

NSSP Call for Proposals
NSSP National Teen Leadership Conference
Calling all presenters!  The NSSP Teen Planning Committee is looking for student presenters to conduct a workshop.  Share your expertise in leadership and/or knowledge in the areas of safe driving issues, healthy life style choices, alcohol, teen pregnancies, and other teen issues.
For more information visit our website here.

NEW PROGRAM TALKS TO TEENS ABOUT IMPAIRED DRIVING
"Road Buzzed: Impaired Driving" is newest free program
from The National Road Safety Foundation

Contact:
David Reich
212 573-6000
david@reichcommunications.com

NEW YORK, Jan. 21, 2014  --  The National Road Safety Foundation, a non-profit organization that produces and distributes free programs on traffic safety, has launched its newest program that deals with an issue that is responsible for thousands of teen deaths every year.
The free program, "Road Buzzed: Impaired Driving”, takes a look from a teen's perspective at impaired driving, which traffic safety officials say is a factor in one of three fatal traffic crashes, killing someone every 48 minutes.

The program, in Powerpoint format, includes a 7-1/2 minute video as well as a discussion guide and presenter's notes.  Designed to empower teens to prevent, avoid or get out of dangerous impaired driving situations, the program is broken into four segments.  One explains that impaired driving is more than drinking and driving, and also can be caused by illegal drugs, prescription and over-the-counter medications and fatigue.  The next segments discuss some common myths about impairment and show warning signs of alcohol poisoning, which can kill.  
The program also discusses peer pressure and dramatizes scenarios where passengers may be at risk because a driver is impaired.  It shows ways to get out of risky driving situations without appearing to be a "wimp," which often stops teens from speaking up when they sense a dangerous driving situation.
The new program is available for viewing or as a download at the National Road Safety Foundation site, www.nrsf.org.  Copies on DVD are also available, free of charge, by requesting them on the www.nrsf.org site or by emailing info@nrsf.org.

Founded 50 years ago, the non-profit National Road Safety Foundation produces traffic safety programs on speed and aggressive driving, drinking and driving, drowsy and distracted driving.  It distributes the free programs to schools, police and traffic safety advocates, community groups and individuals.  The group also sponsors contests for teens, with cash and travel prizes.  More information on the contests is at www.teenlane.org.

Minnesota Driver and Traffic Safety Education (MDTSEA)
Annual Conference
The Minnesota Driver and Traffic Safety Education (MDTSEA) will be holding their annual conference on April 4 and 5, 2014.  It will be held at the Kelly Inn in St. Cloud, MN.  MDTSEA is the professional organization of the high school driver educators in Minnesota.  Some of our members are commercial school teachers also.  Check out MDTSEA and information about the conference on their web site at www.mdtsea.net and clicking on the appropriate icon.

St. Cloud State University is refreshing the available pool of adjunct faculty members to teach Traffic Safety Education courses.  
If you are interested go to http://agency.governmentjobs.com/stcloudstate/default.cfm
for more information:

Many Teens Taking a Pass on a Driver's License
Chantelle Cade, 18, like many teens, loves to go to the mall near her home in Orlando. But Cade doesn't hop in the car to ferry a carload of her friends to the mall. She doesn't drive — or even have a license. "I had wanted to get a driver's license, but it was very easy to put it off because my parents could easily drive me around," says Cade, an honor graduate from Boone High School who's attending Valencia Community College. "It was easy to say, 'Oh, I'll get one next week. Or, it doesn't matter if I don't get one till I'm 18.' " A generation ago, Chantelle Cade would have been considered an anomaly. When kids turned 16, they couldn't wait to get their driver's licenses. It represented freedom, independence, the first big step into adulthood and a response to the call of the open road. The perception was that kids who didn't have a license at 16 either were really bad drivers or really, really uncool. Read more here.

Pay Attention, Kid! Novice Teen Drivers Often Distracted
Surprise: Teens multitask while driving, therefore increasing their risk for a crash. A new report from the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute and the National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development jives with basically every distracted driving report ever released. As it turns out, beginners are more likely to dial a cell phone or write a text, reach away from the steering wheel, get distracted by something along the road, or eat while operating a vehicle. "Any secondary task that takes the novice driver's eyes off the road increases risk," according to Charlie Klauer, group leader for teen risk and injury prevention at the transportation institute's Center for Vulnerable Road User Safety. Read the article here.

Distracted Driving Riskiest for New Drivers
American drivers dial, they text, they eat and they reach - whatever they do, they take their eyes off the road 10 percent of the time they are behind the wheel, according to a new study, and that makes the roadways less safe. Phone dialing and texting were the distractions that come with the greatest risk of accident for all drivers, but for new drivers, even eating, reaching for an object, or looking at something on the side of the road increases the chances of a crash, the study found. The findings come from a Virginia Tech and National Institutes of Health study published this month in the New England Journal of Medicine. For 12-18 months, researchers used in-vehicle cameras and sensors to track about 150 drivers, a quarter of whom were teens who had only had their licenses for three weeks. One result was a little surprising - strictly talking on the phone did not increase the risk of accident for adults or teens, but reaching for the phone and dialing it did, so researchers say they don't endorse using the phone while driving. Read more here.

NH Lawmakers Driven To Curb Distracted Driving
Several New Hampshire legislative proposals to cut down on distracted driving — from bans on electronic devices to outlawing applying makeup or reading a newspaper while behind the wheel — received universal support during a nearly two-hour committee hearing Tuesday. One bill would ban hand-held cellphone use while driving while another would prohibit cellphone use by school bus, taxi and livery drivers. A third bill bans all electronic devices and other forms of distracted driving. Police, health and highway transportation officials spoke in support of a ban. The transportation committee hearing comes just weeks after the fatal hit and run crash of retired Amherst fire chief John Bachman by a 20-year-old motorist who told police he was texting while driving and thought he had hit a snowbank. It was only after seeing media reports that Travis Hobbs, of Mont Vernon, turned himself in to police. Read more here.

Teen Drivers Become Distracted Quickly
Teen drivers quickly move from focused to distracted while behind the wheel, and this raises their risk for accidents, a new study finds. Car crashes are the leading cause of death for U.S. teens, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2010, more than 2,500 teens died in car crashes -- seven deaths every day -- and teen drivers are three times more likely than drivers aged 20 and older to be in fatal crashes. The way to reduce that risk is simple: pay attention, said Dr. Karen Sheehan, medical director of injury prevention and research at Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago. "This study confirms, especially for novice drivers, that we should all follow what the rock band the Doors recommended over 40 years ago in 'Roadhouse Blues': 'Keep your eyes on the road and your hands upon the wheel,'" said Sheehan, who was not involved in the study. Novice drivers also are not good at detecting potential hazards, said study author Charlie Klauer, leader of the Risk and Injury Prevention Group at Virginia Tech. "They are just learning ways to handle and negotiate various traffic conditions," Klauer said. "They are learning that looking away from the road increases their risk. When they engage in tasks that force them to take their eyes off the road, they are at increased risk of being involved in crashes." Read the full story here.


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