August 2014 eNewsletter

In This Issue:

2014 ADTSEA Conference

2014 NSSP Conference

ADTSEA 2015 Executive Committee

TEACHER EXCELLENCE AWARD
PRESENTED
AT DRIVER ED TEACHERS’ NATIONAL CONFERENCE

LHS Driver Ed Instructor Recognized For Excellence

Educating Teens About Driving can be a Moving Target, Officials Say

Parents Could Pay Higher Costs for Driver’s Ed Program

Report Highlights Programs With Potential to Increase
Teen Seat Belt Use

Seatbelt Sensors to Fight Drowsy Driving

2012 Distracted Driving Law Rarely Used

Students Use Humor to Teach Peers About Dangers of Distracted Driving

Survey for the Development of the ADTSEA 4.0 Curriculum

Driver Education Teacher Preparation
Traffic Safety Education (TSE) Courses

Upcoming Events

NETSEA
October 23rd

SCDTSEA
November 21st

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Send your News, Upcoming Events, or Articles that you wish to share with ADTSEA members so we can post them in our future Newsletters to: ADTSEA Office

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ADTSEA Office
1434 Trim Tree Road
Indiana, PA 15701
724-801-8132
office@adtsea.org

 

 

 

2014 ADTSEA Conference
The 58th Annual ADTSEA Conference was held in Wichita, Kansas July 13 – 16, 2014. Keynote speaker, Curtis Waltermire, KS, opened the conference with his engaging presentation “The Art of Distraction”. Education’s Songwriter, Dr. Monte Selby, entertained and inspired attendees during the Bishop Forum and Bill Cordes was motivational with his presentation titled “YOGOWYPI – You Only Get Out What You Put In.” Division Session speakers presented on a variety of topics related to Strategic Planning: Driver Education in the Digital Age.
Members and their guests enjoyed the host outings to various sites for shopping and sightseeing as well as an unforgettable Western entertainment experience at the Prairie Rose Opera House.

Lindsay Townsend was presented with the 2014 Kaywood Award in recognition of his outstanding contributions to traffic safety by Tom Williams, AAA National during the Vermont’s Summer Summit.

Visit the ADTSEA website at www.adtsea.org for downloaded presentations and pictures from the conference.  The Kansas Host Committee did an outstanding job providing members with information, activities and entertainment adding to the success of this year’s conference. Thank you to all our members for your continued support of ADTSEA and we look forward to seeing you all in Raleigh, North Carolina next year! Mark your calendar for July 12-15, 2015!

2014 NSSP Conference
The National Student Safety Program (NSSP) Conference was held in Wichita, Kansas July 12 – 14, 2014. Keynote speaker, Brandon Lee White, KS, opened the conference with his interactive presentation “Let it Move” encouraging teamwork, courage, responsibility, and discipline. U-Haul sponsored the Annual “Safe Trailering Rodeo Competition” which the students enjoyed in spite of the heat. Wichita, KS resident Julie Breitenstein and her son Austin spoke with the students regarding how distracted driving can change your life forever in their presentation titled “Brain Injury Matters.”  Bill Cordes presentation “YOGOWYPI” was a unique blend of stories, humor, audience interaction and powerful messages aimed to get the students involved and thinking about using different life strategies that can empower them to living a better life.

There were several workshops presented by the students from Shelton High SAAD, Campbell High School, Aiea High School, Keaau High School, Oklahoma STEPP Up, Maui High School and Moanalua High.

The students raised money to donate to Wichita Children’s Home which offers emergency, temporary residence and shelter for the children of the community. The students with help from the ADTSEA Conference participants surpassed their goal of $500 and were able to present the Children’s Home with $1,115. Thank you to Jan Meeker, Barbara Brody, Jackie Huster, Carol Hardin and all the advisors for your hard work in making the 2014 NSSP Conference a success! Mark your calendars for the 2015 NSSP Conference, July 11 – 13, 2015 in Raleigh, North Carolina!

ADTSEA 2015 Executive Committee

Cathy Broderick – President
Jan Meeker – President-Elect
Connie Sessoms – Past President
Gary Scott - Secretary / Treasurer
Joe Barch - Board Representative
Barbara Brody - NSSP Liaison
David Reich - Corporate Representative
Tom Prefling - Corporate Representative

North East North West South Central

Joe Barch, VT
Term 2013-2015

Nancy Andrus, VT
Term 2014-2016

Wendy Bills, UT
Term 2013-2015

William Warner,OR
Term 2014-2016

Romona Cook,TX
Term 2013-2015

Richard Wilson, KS
Term 2014-2016

North Central South East South West

Karen Sorenson, WI
Term 2013-2015

Mark Lee, MN
Term 2014-2016

Andrew Johnson, SC
Term 2013-2015

Reggie Flythe, NC
Term 2014-2016

Waynette Mitchell, HI
Term 2013-2015

Fred Nago, HI
Term 2014-2016

 

TEACHER EXCELLENCE AWARD
PRESENTED
AT DRIVER ED TEACHERS’ NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Driver Ed Teachers from Minnesota, Missouri, Vermont get top National Honor
WICHITA, Kansas, July 15, 2014  --  Three driver education teachers have been selected by their peers to receive recognition for teaching excellence at the annual national conference of the American Driver & Traffic Safety Education Association here on July 16.  The Teacher Excellence Awards are given by The National Road Safety Foundation, a non-profit group that creates driver safety education materials and makes them available at no cost to teachers and schools, police, traffic safety advocates and youth organizations.

Chosen by their peers to receive the 2014 Teacher Excellence Award, which carries with it a cash stipend, are Beatrice Kehr of Duluth, Minn., Carol Hoormann of St. Louis, Mo., and John Viau of Essex Junction, Vt.

“Driving instructors are a dedicated group who truly care about saving lives and preventing needless tragedy by helping young people learn how to drive safely and responsibly,” said David Reich, public relations director of The National Road Safety Foundation.  “The three teachers we are honoring are the best of the best.  They have consistently shown creativity and enthusiasm in the important work they do.”

Winner Beatrice Kehr has been teaching driver education for 25 years, mostly in the Duluth public schools. She has also been an advisor to driver education student teachers at St. Could State University.  She has held leadership roles including as president of the Minnesota Driver & Traffic Safety Education Association and serves on a taskforce pushing for the state to adapt to the driver education curriculum to follow the   new National Standards for Driver Education and Teacher Preparation.  Kehr credits her love of driver education to her father, who taught her to drive a tractor on his dairy farm when she was six.  “Dad was always teaching driving strategies when driving, long before it was time to get my license, and I’ve always felt driving is an important life skill,” she said.

Carol Hoormann has been teaching driver education for 16 years, mostly at Lindbergh High School in St. Louis, where she still teaches and chairs the Driver & Traffic Safety Education Department.  For the past eight years, she has been active in the Missouri Driver Safety Education Association, where she serves as executive director.  She also serves on the Missouri Dept. of Transportation’s Blueprint Committee, which works to reduce highway fatalities and increase traffic safety education in the St. Louis area.  Hoormann said she grew up in an environment where safety was emphasized, since her father was manager of safety and health at Union Electric and taught safety at Washington University.  “I attended Central Missouri State to pursue a teaching degree because it was a tio-ranked school for safety with an outstanding driver education program,” she said.  “I knew I had a passion for safety education.”

John Viau, the third Teacher Excellence Award recipient, has been teaching driver education for ten years, most recently at Fairfax High School in Vermont.  He has been active in the Vermont Driver Traffic Safety Education Association, where he served as president in 2012 – 2013.  Earlier this year, he was named Vermont Driver Education Teacher of the Year.  He feels there is a critical need to recruit new trainees to driver education.  “I think traffic safety might take a turn for the worse if we can’t find, educate and place quality educators to train our new drivers in the years to come,” said Viau.   

The American Driver and Traffic Safety Education is the professional association that represents traffic safety educators throughout the United States.  As a national advocate for quality traffic safety education, the group creates and publishes policies and guidelines for driver ed and conducts conferences and workshops for teachers.  It was instrumental in creating the new driver education curriculum standard issued recently by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

For more than 50 years, The National Road Safety Foundation (NRSF), a non-profit organization, has created driver education programs for free distribution to schools, police, traffic safety agencies, youth advocacy groups and others.  NRSF has programs on speed and aggression, drinking and driving, and drowsy driving.  Its newest programs, “Road Buzzed: A Look at Impaired Driving,” "Generation tXt" and "Stay in the Picture", address impaired and distracted driving and prom and summer driving safety aimed at young people.  NRSF also sponsors contests for teens in partnership with SADD (Students Against Destructive Decisions) and Scholastic.  To view free programs and for more information, visit www.nrsf.org or www.teenlane.org.

LHS Driver Ed Instructor Recognized For Excellence
Lindbergh High School (LHS) driver education instructor Carol Hoormann was one of three educators nationwide to receive a Teacher Excellence Award at the 2014 American Driver and Traffic Safety Education Association National Conference July 16 in Wichita, Kan. The Teacher Excellence Awards are presented annually by the National Road Safety Foundation (NRSF). Award recipients are selected by their peers for outstanding teaching and service to driver and traffic safety education. Hoormann is the first instructor from Missouri to win the award.
Hoormann has been teaching driver education at Lindbergh High School for 14 years, accompanying students behind the wheel as they practice their skills on the roads and parking lots surrounding LHS. She is the executive director of the Missouri Driver and Safety Education Association and serves on the Missouri Department of Transportation Blueprint Committee, which works to reduce highway fatalities and increase traffic safety education in the St. Louis area. Read more here.

Educating Teens About Driving can be a Moving Target, Officials Say
Connie Sessoms says when it comes to high-stakes testing in schools, the stakes don’t come any higher than in driver education. “If a child is working out a math problem and they get it wrong … they have an opportunity to erase it and do it over – life is good, they learn, which is our goal,” said Sessoms, a longtime driver education teacher. “This driver education thing, if they don’t get it and they hit a tree at 50 mph, they don’t get to do that over,” he said. “Their life is forever altered, if that child survives. If they don’t survive, their family is forever changed. That’s the kind of stuff we’re working with.” Sessoms, of Charlotte, N.C., is president of the the American Driver & Traffic Safety Education Association. He’s one of about 200 members of the organization, hailing from states from Hawaii to Vermont, who gathered in Wichita this week for a conference on the latest trends in driver training. These are tough times for the profession. Though statistics indicate teen traffic fatalities are down in Kansas, instructors say they are worried about waning driver education programs and an exponential increase in driver distractions on the road today. Budgetary clamps have forced many school districts to drop driver education entirely. Wichita’s USD 259 cut the program in the 2010-11 school year, spokeswoman Susan Arensman said. In districts that still offer it, which includes most Wichita suburban districts, it’s usually seen more as an after-school or summer add-on, rather than a core part of the curriculum. Because school districts aren’t hiring as much, universities are dropping their programs to train driver education teachers, contributing to a growing teacher shortage as baby-boomer educator’s age out. And technology has dramatically changed the way driver education has to be taught. Read more.

Parents Could Pay Higher Costs for Driver’s Ed Program
NORTH CAROLINA — With state lawmakers still working to hammer out a budget deal, one decision many parents will be looking out for is cuts to the driver's education program.
The Senate's proposal cuts funding for the course altogether which means parents could end up paying hundreds of dollars. Eyewitness News spoke to local parents who say the money saved is not worth the lives it could cost. "$26 million is a small price to pay for safe driving. I think it will cost more in the long run," said Chris Sanchez, a parent. When these parents heard about the Senate's plan to cut $26 million needed for the driver's education program they were shocked. "My son who's 15 just went through driver's ed in May and June," said parent Vanessa McPherson. McPherson paid for her son to take the program at school. Currently schools can charge up to $55 for the driver's education course. However the Senate's proposal removes that cap which would allow schools to charge parents the true cost of the program, which ranges anywhere from $300 to $350. "For us if that wasn't provided we would find another way to pay for it but I think there are a lot of families who would go without," said McPherson. Read more.

Report Highlights Programs With Potential to Increase
Teen Seat Belt Use

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Buckling up has always been a simple action that dramatically increases a person’s chances of surviving a crash, but more than half of teen drivers killed in 2012 failed to use a seat belt. What’s more shocking is that this number has increased by six percent over the last three years. And worse, teen passengers killed in fatal crashes use their seat belts even less than fatally injured teen drivers – almost 20 percent less. A report by the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) and The Allstate Foundation is giving states and localities tools to combat these trends by highlighting programs across the country that can serve as models to increase teen seat belt use rates. The report, Getting It to Click: Connecting Teens and Seat Belts, examines the elements of effective teen seat belt programs, showcases promising programs currently implemented in 12 states, and recommendations to accelerate the success of programs motivating teens to buckle up. Read the article here.

Seatbelt Sensors to Fight Drowsy Driving
You can't kick back and enjoy a nap while cruising in self-driving cars just yet. But a new generation of smarter cars may be able to watch out for signs of a nap attack by measuring your heartbeat and breathing patterns.

A European project called HARKEN has created a sensor system built into the safety belt and seat cover of cars that can detect fatigue or drowsiness even before the appearance of more obvious symptoms such as yawning or bad driving patterns. The system could potentially lead to a driver warning system capable of helping to chip away at the annual death toll from road accidents—33,561 fatalities in the United States and 28,100 fatalities in the European Union in 2012. Read more here.

2012 Distracted Driving Law Rarely Used
“Kulesh, Kubert and Bolis’ Law” was named for New Jersey residents who suffered life changing injuries or who were killed in distracted driving crashes. It was signed in July of 2012. But today…

“We just had the two-year mark with the law being passed and so far in the state of New Jersey there hasn’t been anyone prosecuted,” said Washington Township resident Angela Donato whose sister was killed in a crash.

“This new law is good, but it’s very hard to prove,” said People Against Distracted Driving President Mike Kellenyi. More here

Students Use Humor to Teach Peers About Dangers of Distracted Driving
Some Connecticut high school students are trying to spread the message of safe teen driving through comedy performances. The student production is called “Drive It Home”, and it is aimed at spreading awareness about safe driving, set around a session between a “Dr. Phil”-type psychologist, a parent, and child.

"There is a lot of lack of communication going on. The mom is not doing appropriate parenting, and so the skit is explaining different forms of parenting, how to be a good parent, and how to go through the steps of driving with your teenager," said Catherine McElaney, one of the student actors.

The project is funded, in part, through the Allstate Foundation and Connecticut Children’s Medical Center. Read more here.

Survey for the Development of the ADTSEA 4.0 Curriculum
The American Driver and Traffic Safety Education Association (ADTSEA) is conducting a survey to assist with the development of a new and improved 4.0 curriculum. We would like to seek your assistance to determine ways to improve and update the curriculum. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

To complete the survey please use the following link to Survey Monkey.

Driver Education Teacher Preparation
Traffic Safety Education (TSE) Courses
2014 Fall Semester Calendar
NOW 90% ONLINE, D2L!
10% INTERACTIVE TELEVISION, ITV!

St. Cloud State University
Continuing Studies

DRIVER EDUCATION LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS
(13 credits)
See SCSU web pages for more TSE information at:
http://www.stcloudstate.edu/continuingstudies/driversed/default.asp
Or
http://bulletin.stcloudstate.edu/courses.asp?deptCode=tse

Students who are seeking Driver Education licensure to teach in Minnesota Public, or Private Schools must successfully complete the following courses (required core of 13 credits):  Now all the TSE courses are 90% on-line, located on (D2L) Desire To Learn and 10% (6 sessions) ITV.  Work at your own pace, on your own time, from your computer to complete the driver education licensure program.  You must be officially registered to take the courses and have your Husky Net account set up prior to the start of classes to access D2L.

Fall Semester, August 25th to December 10th 2014


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